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federico ochoa constructs rhomboidal church in argentina making use of residential materials

in Design Nerd by

committed to one of argentina’s initial saints, the chapel is brilliantly illuminated by an opening in the ceiling that stays concealed.

The blog post federico ochoa constructs rhomboidal chapel in argentina using residential materials appeared initially on designboom|style & layout magazine. designboom|style & layout magazine

Chateau d’Oex: the Church on the Hill – Wallpaper

in Travel Nerd by

Chateau d'Oex Church Wallpaper [Cover]

Lots of people dream of a winter vacation in a warm place – usually a tropical beach – and I traveled a couple of times in the southern hemisphere when I visited South Africa and New Zealand.

It sure is nice to wear a t-shirt and be barefoot when family and friends are muffled in woolen scarves and heavy jackets, but I had a hard time feeling the Christmas spirit, which I associate to the cold and snow.

Longing for the small church on the hill in Chateau d’Oex

I grew up in Chateau d’Oex, a small mountain village in Switzerland where year after year I enjoyed the snow covering the mountains like a white blanket, making everything looking soft and delicate.

One of the loveliest sights was the church, perched on a hill overlooking the town and visible from everywhere. I haven’t experienced a white Christmas in the last few years and I long for the view on the little church under the snow,  which has become my latest desktop wallpaper (and can be yours if you like it).

 

 

 

 

 

And if you want to see more photos, join me also on Instagram. Thank you!

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Wild About Travel

A 100-Year-Old Church Transformed Into A Skate Park Painted With Colorful Graffiti

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A historic church in the Spanish city of llanera was transformed into a skate-park earlier this year by La Iglesia Skate; titled Kaos Temple, it has now undergone a second, more colorful transformation at the hands of street-artist Okuda San Miguel.

In collaboration with Red Bull, Okuda filled the church with bright, isometric, paintings. Verkami describes some of the work: “His iconic artistic piece Kaos Star represents a colorful and isometric rose of the winds that tries to tell us that it does not matter were you are, or what you are doing, what matters are your own goals.”

More info: okudart.es | verkami.com | Facebook (h/t: ufunkdesignboom)

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Image credits: Red Bull Media

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Image credits: La Iglesia Skate

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Image credits: Red Bull Media

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Image credits: okudart

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Image credits: La Iglesia Skate / Red Bull Media

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Image credits: Red Bull Media

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Image credits: okudart

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Image credits: La Iglesia Skate

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Image credits: Red Bull Media

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Image credits: Red Bull Media

Before and after

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Image credits: La Iglesia Skate / Red Bull Media

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Old English church transformed into a theatre by Foster Wilson Architects

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Foster Wilson Architects has converted a heritage-listed church in Bedford, England, into a theatre with a new curved timber and glass foyer bar (+ slideshow).

The Quarry Theatre in Bedford by Foster Wilson Architects

The Quarry Theatre at St Luke’s occupies a previously redundant Moravian church and minister’s house, which both back onto Bedford School.

Foster Wilson Architects oversaw the refurbishment of the old structures, and designed an extension that opens to the building up to the original church garden.

The Quarry Theatre in Bedford by Foster Wilson Architects

The church was consecrated in 1865 but finally closed in 2008. The project’s aim was to transform the historic structure into a facility that could be used by the school, touring theatre groups, or members of the community.

The Quarry Theatre in Bedford by Foster Wilson Architects

The church faces one of the town’s key thoroughfares, so it was retained as the main frontage for the theatre.



“The building’s location was ideal, with its main facade facing the town and the back facing the school grounds,” architect Tim Foster told Dezeen. “This allows the theatre to face both ways, both physically and metaphorically.”

The Quarry Theatre in Bedford by Foster Wilson Architects

“The church is retained as a single public assembly space, which is much more appropriate than chopping it up to create residential units, which might otherwise have been its fate,” he added.

The Quarry Theatre in Bedford by Foster Wilson Architects

A foyer and teaching room lead through to the new 300-seat auditorium.

Located within the central area of the chapel, the hall was created by erecting a steel structure inside the existing walls so the original volume and features remain visible.

The Quarry Theatre in Bedford by Foster Wilson Architects

A flat-floored stage surrounded by tiered seating is overlooked by the church’s existing balcony, which the architects extended forward and re-tiered to improve sight lines to the stage.

The Quarry Theatre in Bedford by Foster Wilson Architects

Two levels of new galleries extend along either side of the auditorium, above which a rig for suspending scenery and stage lighting is positioned.

The Quarry Theatre in Bedford by Foster Wilson Architects

“We wanted to respect and work with the grain of the original building while adapting it to its new use,” Foster explained. “Wherever possible, original spaces have been restored by removing later additions that confused the clarity of the original plan.”

The Quarry Theatre in Bedford by Foster Wilson Architects

The extension at the rear of the building wraps around the outside of the curved chancel, where the original exterior brick wall is left exposed and complemented by new fair-faced brick walls.

An additional foyer and bar are contained in the extension, which is flanked by a wall of glass. The space opens out to a terrace that connects the building with the gardens and the school beyond.

The Quarry Theatre in Bedford by Foster Wilson Architects

“By radiating the new foyer around the original apsidal chancel wall and keeping the roof low, we were able to allow the original building to remain visible above it,” said the architect.

“The curved glazed wall provides a panoramic view of the gardens, filling the space between the original vestry and the new backstage accommodation,” he added. “The new addition is clearly contemporary but aims to work with the original building in terms of its form and materials.”

The Quarry Theatre in Bedford by Foster Wilson Architects

A former minister’s house adjoining the church was adapted to contain front-of-house facilities including a booking office and a foyer in the former vestry. Its upper levels accommodate offices and a studio.

The Quarry Theatre in Bedford by Foster Wilson Architects

The architects endeavoured to retain and repair existing materials wherever possible, employing lime plaster in the original buildings. Oak flooring and joinery create a sense of continuity throughout the interior.

The Quarry Theatre in Bedford by Foster Wilson Architects

Other examples of churches converted for cultural purposes include a stone building in a Franciscan convent that now houses an auditorium and a cultural centre featuring pivoting golden cabinets that occupies a Dutch church dating back to the 13th century.

Photography is by Philip Vile.


Project credits:

Client: Bedford School
Architect: Foster Wilson Architects
Project manager & QS: Ainsley & Partners
Structural engineer: Price & Myers Services
Engineer: Ernest Griffiths
Theatre consultant: Theatreplan
Acoustician: Gillieron Scott Acoustic Design
Main contractor: SDC Builders Ltd

The Quarry Theatre in Bedford by Foster Wilson Architects
Ground floor plan – click for larger image
The Quarry Theatre in Bedford by Foster Wilson Architects
First floor plan – click for larger image
The Quarry Theatre in Bedford by Foster Wilson Architects
Second floor plan – click for larger image
The Quarry Theatre in Bedford by Foster Wilson Architects
Sections – click for larger image


Related story: Auditorium in the Church of Saint Francis’ Convent by David Closes

Auditorium in the Church of Saint Francis'<br /> Convent by David Closes

Jagged glazed stairwells climb the stone walls of this eighteenth century church in Catalonia that architect David Closes has converted into an auditorium. More »

Related movie: MVRDV’s Stedelijk Museum renovation makes way for the historical details says Nathalie de Vries

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Dezeen

A church conversion in London

in Design Nerd by

Yes folks, it is another church conversion here on DTI, because Jo and I love a good conversion and churches have such incredible, dramatic architecture. This church is 19th century with a gothic vibe, and features 4 bedrooms each with their own bathrooms, a specially commissioned kitchen, hand painted columns, gloriously huge arched windows, blackened oak herringbone floor (dying over this!!) and a small courtyard. This is by far one of my favourite church conversions we have featured. A new location on the Shoot Factory roster. 

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400-Year-Old Colonial Church Emerges From Waters In Mexico

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A 400-year-old church submerged in a reservoir in the southern Mexican state of Chiapas has emerged due to a drought in the region that has reduced water levels by 25 meters (82 feet). Local fishermen have been taking visitors onto the Grijalva river to visit the church, which was submerged by a dam built in 1966 to form the Nezahualcoyotl reservoir. The church has emerged twice since the dam was built.

The 16-meter-tall church, known as the Temple of Santiago (or of Quechula) was built some time in the 16th century but “was abandoned due the big plagues of 1773-1776,” Mexican architect Carlos Navarrete told AP News. The church was built due to its position along an important highway built and used by Spanish conquistadors. “It was a church built thinking that this could be a great population center, but it never achieved that,” Navarrete said. “It probably never even had a dedicated priest.” The church is also surrounded by the submerged town of Quechula.

(h/t: ap news)

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Image credits: AP / David von Blohn

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Matthew Lloyd builds decorative brick homes around a 19th-century London church

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Diamond-patterned brickwork helps this trio of high-rise apartment blocks in east London blend in with the historic 19th-century church that it surrounds (+ slideshow).

St Mary of Eton by Matthew Lloyd Architects
Photograph by Bendict Luxmoore

Local studio Matthew Lloyd Architects designed the buildings to host 27 new flats, a shop and a community hall for the St Mary of Eton Church, a heritage-listed Anglican church near the Olympic Park in Hackney Wick, east London.

St Mary of Eton by Matthew Lloyd Architects

The red brick church and its ancillary buildings were constructed over a period of 30 years at the end of the 19th century. To help the new blocks harmonise with the old, an earthy-red brick skin was selected.



Glazed pastel blue and oyster white bricks criss-cross the red brick walls, creating a diagonal pattern – known as diaper – that compliments the detailing of the original complex.

St Mary of Eton by Matthew Lloyd Architects
Photograph by Bendict Luxmoore

“Each of the new buildings responds to its specific context and use, but each is given a common exterior treatment,” said the architects. “The diaper-patterned brickwork skin is treated as a wrapping applied consistently across the whole scheme to restore the sense of a coherent whole.”

“The crispness of these glazed bricks sits in counterpoint to the softer reds and makes the pattern dance and shine as the sun moves across it; on the corners of the buildings, the subtle diamond pattern folds around like cloth,” they added.

St Mary of Eton by Matthew Lloyd Architects
Photograph by Mikael Schilling

Older structures, described the architects as substandard, were cleared from the site to provide space for the three new buildings.

The complex’s Mission Hall was also restored and converted to host 10 apartments, while the historic church tower now contains a single five-storey dwelling. Community facilities and further apartments are set within the new buildings that surround the church.

St Mary of Eton by Matthew Lloyd Architects
Photograph by Patricia Woodward

“The profile of the church is framed and strengthened by the two new apartment buildings,” said the architects. “The new interventions make a strong urban statement enhancing the street setting of the listed church.”

The project also included the restoration of the church. Timber slats were used to line the walls, concealing doors that lead onto a cloistered walkway linking the building with a pair of courtyards.

St Mary of Eton by Matthew Lloyd Architects
Photograph by Patricia Woodward

The larger of the two courtyards is set back from the street and provides side access to the church, flats and a cafe, which features folding glazed doors.

The second courtyard sits on the other side of the church and links the new church hall and further apartments with a small chapel.

St Mary of Eton by Matthew Lloyd Architects
Photograph by Mikael Schilling

“The scheme increases the historic church building’s visibility and access, with more routes, more entrances, and better use of outdoor spaces,” said the architects.

Income generated from the lease of the flats will fund the work of St Mary of Eton Church, which was built for the Eton College Mission to minister to impoverished communities in east London.

St Mary of Eton by Matthew Lloyd Architects
Photograph by Mikael Schilling

“The brief was to develop a scheme that would enable the church to respond to community need by funding restoration and renewal, through the provision of housing,” explained the architects.

“The vibrant mix of landscaping, new dwellings, and modern community resources will act as a catalyst for the regeneration of the whole area.”

St Mary of Eton by Matthew Lloyd Architects
Photograph by Bendict Luxmoore

The St Mary of Eton Church, Apartments and Community Rooms was one of 37 winners of the RIBA Awards 2015, announced in June. Other winners included a shoe-polish factory converted into offices and a sculptural swimming pool.


Project credits:

Architects: Matthew Lloyd Architects
Church client: St Mary of Eton PCC (with London Diocesan Fund for Vicarage)
Developer: Thornsett Group
Contractor: PJ Hegarty & Sons
Structural engineers: Manhire Associates Consulting Engineers
M&E engineers: Engineering Design Consultants (EDC)
Project management: Roder Levitt Bucknall

St Mary of Eton by Matthew Lloyd Architects
Site plan – click for larger image
St Mary of Eton by Matthew Lloyd Architects
Ground floor plan – click for larger image
St Mary of Eton by Matthew Lloyd Architects
Section one – click for larger image
St Mary of Eton by Matthew Lloyd Architects
Section two – click for larger image

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Dezeen

Glazed pavilions form a community centre in the grounds of an old Flemish church

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These two glass and metal pavilions erected by architecture collective De Kort Van Schaik Van Noten in the gardens of a disused presbytery kind a neighborhood corridor and youth club for a Belgian village (+ slideshow).

Moorsel Community Centre by De Kort Van Schaik Van Noten

The Moorsel Neighborhood Centre was conceived by De Kort Van Schaik Van Noten – a collaborative created up of Rotterdam-primarily based De Kort Van Schaik and Antwerp studio Van Noten Architects – for the site of a shown 18th-century pastor’s house and its walled gardens in Moorsel, a village about 20 miles north-west of Brussels.



The architects remaining the existing constructing unaltered, incorporating two new structures together one aspect of the site to home the multi-goal corridor and self-contained youth club. They also opened up the existing walled gardens to generate a community park.

Moorsel Community Centre by De Kort Van Schaik Van Noten

“In incorporating new buildings to the presbytery complicated, the goal was to locate a way of integrating them with the attribute ensemble of presbytery and walled backyard garden,” the De Kort Van Schaik team advised Dezeen.

Moorsel Community Centre by De Kort Van Schaik Van Noten

“The guiding principle was that the new architecture need to affirm the presbytery’s status as the most expressive constructing at the leading of the backyard and increase, as if it ended up one particular of the garden partitions, together one particular side of the yard,” they described.

Moorsel Community Centre by De Kort Van Schaik Van Noten

The two structures characteristic glass partitions with black steel frames, concrete floors, and a flat timber and metal roof. The glazing is set absent from the edge of the concrete flooring and roof slabs to produce a narrow protected walkway together the edges of both buildings.

Moorsel Community Centre by De Kort Van Schaik Van Noten

The local community hall is positioned closest to the previous stone church, while the youth club sits at the bottom of the yard in a more wooded spot of the site.

Moorsel Community Centre by De Kort Van Schaik Van Noten

The hall is utilised by village people for get-togethers, conferences and the occasional film night, whilst the second framework varieties a new property for the village youth team.

Moorsel Community Centre by De Kort Van Schaik Van Noten

Inside of, concrete walls are left uncovered and chunky timber ceiling beams conceal lighting and ventilation programs from look at.

Moorsel Community Centre by De Kort Van Schaik Van Noten

A strip of landscaping containing a phase and seating region separates the two buildings. Minimal concrete walls and bracing steel trusses offer some privateness and shelter for the backyard garden, whilst breaks in the wall offer links with the bigger gardens and give sights of a church steeple.

Moorsel Community Centre by De Kort Van Schaik Van Noten

“The new architecture allows the general public to experience the exclusive environment of the historic heritage,” additional the architects.

Moorsel Community Centre by De Kort Van Schaik Van Noten

Images is by Filip Dujardin.


Task credits:

Architect: De Kort Van Schaik Van Noten
Consumer: VZW Parochiale Werken Sint-Martinus
Crew: Robert-Jan de Kort, Sander van Schaik, Sophie Van Noten
Structural engineering and building services: Shut to Bone
Contractor: Van Herreweghe Bouw, Alpas NV, De Jonge &amp Zoon

Moorsel Community Centre by De Kort Van Schaik Van Noten
Scenario plan – click for larger impression
Moorsel Community Centre by De Kort Van Schaik Van Noten
Web site plan – click for greater image
Moorsel Community Centre by De Kort Van Schaik Van Noten
Basement ground plan – simply click for larger graphic
Moorsel Community Centre by De Kort Van Schaik Van Noten
Ground flooring prepare – click for greater graphic
Moorsel Community Centre by De Kort Van Schaik Van Noten
Segment – click on for larger graphic

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Dezeen

A church conversion in Byron Bay

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I am having a fast kitchen-portray split to share this gorgeous church conversion in Byron Bay with you. It was showcased on the pretty Citizens of the Globe and is the residence of Amanda Callan, Andrew Morris, their son and their side undertaking Church Farm General Shop. I definitely really like this conversion. The unique home windows are gorgeous, the room does not study as well considerably like a church, and they did not modernize it (which usually occurs and the final results generally are unsuccessful miserably). It is excellent. More details and pictures (by Dominic Loneragan) are right here.&nbsp

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