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Forest mood! by Patrice Thomas

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Forest mood! by Patrice Thomas

Patrice Thomas: Photos


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Mother Of The Forest by Kilian Schönberger

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Mother Of The Forest by Kilian Schönberger

@kilianschoenberger I N S T A G R A M L A N D S C A P E P H O T O G R A P H Y facebook

Kilian Schönberger: Photos


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A Floating Forest To Be Installed In Rotterdam

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On March 16, 2016, a floating forest of 20 trees will be launched in Rotterdam, Holland. Inspired by an art piece named “In Search Of Habitus,” by artist Jorge Bakker, local art collective Mothership is behind this more ambitious project. After conducting a successful trial in 2014, the group felt it was ready to move forward.

“The Bobbing Forest will be made mostly from pre-existing materials,” states the project webpage. “The trees will be donated by the Bomendepot. Each time a part of the city is renovated, trees have to be moved. In the past, these trees would have been destroyed; nowadays, however, the city’s Public Works Department stores them at the Bomendepot. Twenty old sea buoys from the North Sea will be provided by Rijkswaterstaa…”

More info: dobberendbos.nl | enterthemothership.com (h/t: contemporist)

20 floating trees are going to be launched in Rotterdam this year

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Image credits: urbancontest.com

The project was inspired by an art piece named “In Search Of Habitus,” by artist Jorge Bakker

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Image credits: Jorge Bakker

A trial in 2014 was successful

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Image credits: urbancontest.com

“The Bobbing Forest will be made mostly from pre-existing materials”

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A cottage in a forest

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I spotted this year-round cottage on Décormag yesterday and had to share because this is my dream summer getaway….except it needs to be lake-fronted. And maybe in a warmer climate, like Mexico. 😉 This stunner is located in the Eastern Townships of Québec and was designed by Atelier Barda. I am dying over the black stained wood exterior, and the simplicity of the interior is all you need in a second residence. And a must in a dwelling with surroundings this beautiful – those large windows framing scenes of the forest as art. (Photos: Yves Lefebvre)

desire to inspire

Mysterious Forest Of 400 Crooked Trees In Poland Is Still A Mystery For Scientists

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There’s a small grove of regular pine trees in West Pomerania, Poland, that has become famous because of one little “twist” – all 400 of the trees located there have a strange bend at the base!

The stand of trees was planted around 1930 in what was then Germany. The trees all take a sharp 90-degree turn soon after leaving the ground before sweeping back into an upright position with a graceful curve. Their strange but beautiful nature is captured perfectly in the below photos by Kilian Schönberger, whom we’ve written about before here.

No one is certain how or why the trees were bent, but most believe that it was an intentional, mechanical process. Trees can be manipulated to create naturally bent parts for, beaots, furniture or other applications. Others have theorized that a severe snowfall could have caused the curious phenomenon.

More info: kilianschoenberger.de | Facebook | Instagram | Behance (h/t: colossal)

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Wild Walk is a treetop trail that rises above a forest in Upstate New York

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Bridges and paths supported by pointed towers made from pre-rusted steel tubes form a walkway that allows visitors to wander among the treetops of the Adirondack Park in Upstate New York.

Wild Walk by Linearscape

Wild Walk is located within The Wild Center, a 32-hectare nature reserve operated by a non-profit organisation in the heart of the 2.5 million hectare Adirondack Park.

The design for the Wild Walk was developed by architect Charles P Reay, a former senior vice-president at American firm HOK, who is known for his work on the IBM Pavilion at the 1964 World’s Fair.

Wild Walk by Linearscape

Reay also designed The Wild Center’s main museum building, which opened in 2006. Construction of the Wild Walk was overseen by New York City studio Linearscape, which acted as the project’s architect of record.



The Wild Center’s aim is to encourage people to explore and understand the natural environment of the Adirondacks through science-based experiences, exhibits and events.

Wild Walk by Linearscape

A website dedicated to the project mentions New York’s High Line project, which follows an elevated section of a former railroad in Manhattan, as a key influence on the decision to raise the walkway off the ground. A similar project on the slopes of Table Mountain in South Africa features a pathway that meanders through the treetops of a botanical garden.

Wild Walk by Linearscape

Wild Walk offers visitors an opportunity to follow a trail of bridges that rises to a height of 12 metres above ground level so they can experience an alternative perspective of the forest.

Pointed towers supporting the decked walkways and platforms are constructed from pre-weathered steel posts, with galvanised steel used for other parts of the structure to reduce the total cost.

Wild Walk by Linearscape

The cylindrical elements are intended to recall the trunks of the surrounding white pine trees, while the rusted Corten steel was chosen to blend with the tones of the forest.

Patrick Dillon’s SaLo House is an off-grid forest dwelling overlooking the Pacific Ocean

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Architect Patrick Dillon built this sustainable house on a forested hilltop in Panama from salvaged materials that had to be brought to the site by boat and horseback (+ slideshow).

SaLo House by Patrick Dillon

The project to design and build the SaLo House, which is named after its location near the tip of Punta de San Lorenzo, began in 1997 when Dillon was working on the construction of a bridge over the San Pablo River in southwestern Panama.

SaLo House by Patrick Dillon

The architect spent his weekends surfing at nearby Santa Catalina and decided it would be the perfect place to build an idyllic off-grid home.

SaLo House by Patrick Dillon

“I was sitting out in the break one summer evening admiring a spectacular sunset and it occurred to me that I should look for some land to build a house on,” Dillon told Dezeen. “The next day I rented a boat and drove up the coast. That was the start of a five-year process of acquiring land and building the house.”

SaLo House by Patrick Dillon

Dillon settled on a hilltop site that had been devastated by slash-and-burn farming and was only accessible by land during the dry season. This prompted him to construct the house from lightweight materials that were transported by boat and then carried up the hillside by hand or with the help of horses.

SaLo House by Patrick Dillon

Most of the materials used in the house were salvaged from the bridge project, including steel channels that were bolted together on site to make beam sections for the arching roof structure. A similarly low-impact house built in an Ecuadorian rainforest uses locally sourced bamboo for its structural framework.



Galvanised metal purlins that span the spaces between the beams support a corrugated steel roof. The roof arcs upwards to the north and south from its lowest point, and is designed to funnel prevailing winds from either direction through the interior to act as natural ventilation.

SaLo House by Patrick Dillon

Other unusual building materials employed in the project include corrugated fibreglass panels used for the sliding walls and surfaces made from galvanised lath covered in plaster. The flooring is mostly recycled pressure-treated pine or Douglas fir that was salvaged from demolished houses in the region.

SaLo House by Patrick Dillon

A key aspect of the project was the revival of the site’s natural ecosystem, which had been ruined by the unregulated agricultural activity. Random planting and the introduction of an open-air cistern filled with captured rainwater were introduced to support the site’s gradual rejuvenation.

SaLo House by Patrick Dillon

Folding green panels animate facade of Forest House restaurant by JYA-rchitects

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Green panels produce a grid throughout the facade of this restaurant in Bupyeong, South Korea, folding open up to expose the upstairs eating place to the avenue (+ slideshow). (much more&hellip)

gilbert moity sculpts hanging forest for belgian chocolate shop

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placed earlier mentioned a massive bronze sculpture, the lights piece haphazardly demarcates the central axis of the over

The post gilbert moity sculpts hanging forest for belgian chocolate store appeared 1st on designboom | architecture &amp style magazine.

designboom | architecture & design and style journal

The Tallest Tower in South America Is in the Middle of the Amazon Forest (10 photos)

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Deep in Brazil&#39s Amazon jungle, far more than a hundred miles from the nearest metropolis, stands South The united states&#39s tallest construction, the Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO). Reaching 325 meters (or 1,066 feet) into the sky earlier mentioned the trees, the ATTO is taller than the Chrysler Developing or the Eiffel Tower.

Constructed in a collaboration amongst Germany&#39s Max Planck Institute and Brazil&#39s Nationwide Institute for Amazon Research, the tower will be equipped with substantial-tech devices and an observatory to keep an eye on relationships between the jungle and the atmosphere starting in July. In accordance to the institutes, ATTO will gather information on heat, h2o, carbon fuel, winds, cloud formation and weather conditions patterns.

The Amazon Tall Tower Observatory (ATTO), pictured in Sao Sebastiao do Uatuma in the middle of the Amazon forest in Amazonas condition, Brazil, on January eight. The Amazon Tall Tower Observatory is a project of Brazil&#39s Countrywide Institute of Amazonian Analysis and Germany&#39s Max Planck Institute, and will be equipped with high-tech instruments and an observatory to monitor associations among the jungle and the ambiance from subsequent July. (Bruno Kelly/Reuters)


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van schoor + mawad project light effects onto bioluminescent forest

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the artwork piece makes use of technology to colorfully intensify concealed specifics of the all-natural entire world.

The submit van schoor + mawad project mild results onto bioluminescent forest appeared first on designboom | architecture &amp design magazine.

designboom | architecture & style journal

The enchantment of the forest by Alvar Astúlez

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The enchantment of the forest by Alvar Astúlez

Alvar Astúlez: Photos


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Jägnefält Milton’s Forest Pavilion tests new Swedish building law

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Stockholm studio Jägnefält Milton has designed a leaf-formed pavilion for a woodland website – having benefit of a new Swedish organizing stipulation that allows structures under a specified size to be constructed with out authorization.

Forest Pavilion by J&#xE4gnef&#xE4lt Milton

Jägnefält Milton collaborated with the Berlin place of work of engineering organization Arup on the layout of Forest Pavilion, a straightforward woodland shelter developed to exploit a building law introduced earlier this calendar year.



The Attefallshus clause implies organizing authorization is no for a longer time needed for structures with an area underneath 25 square metres and a peak of considerably less than 4 metres, so the architects developed a pavilion within these proportions.

Forest Pavilion by J&#xE4gnef&#xE4lt Milton

Forest Pavilion is created as an oval platform with a matching roof manufactured from lead. “It really is a leaf, it truly is as straightforward as that,” studio co-founder Konrad Milton told Dezeen.

Forest Pavilion by J&#xE4gnef&#xE4lt Milton

Patterns present a wooden platform with a patterned parquet floor that raises the base of the pavilion previously mentioned the floor. In accordance to the architects, all the timber needed for design will be sourced during the site clearance.

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